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the assad regime in syria, allowing the over flights by iran. now, if so, that raises serious questions about u.s./iraqi relations going forward. secretary kerry met with iraqi prime minister malkey in his unannounced stroz baghdad today. and those iranian flights were at the top of the agend a. the secretary and the prime minister had a private meeting that kerry described as a spirited discussion. when it was over, the secretary told reporters, quote, anything that supportings president assad is problematic. i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to discontinue president osaud and his regime. thez believes the iranian aircraft flying over iraq are carrying weapons to help arm the syrian government, although it rawn insists it is humanitarian aid. the u.s. has asked iraq to force the planes to land in iraq for inspections. but only a few have been checked. they have long been a point of conflict between the and u.s. iraq. >> the intent here, fwy going public, is to increase the pressure on al-malma laki. but it shows how minimal ou
in syria. u.s. and israeli intelligence say the assad regime is poised to use chemical weapons. >> once you let that situation spin out of control, it's very hard to -- to stop, and can have enormous spillover effects across the region. >> reporter: the cia is already training selected rebel groups to guard against a takeover by more radical elements once assad falls. the regime's weakness was demonstrated again thursday, by a suicide bombing at a damascus mosque. killing a prominent assad supporter. today, activists said rebels seized a key air base in the south, along the jordanian border where rebel forces, including some islamic militants, are almost face-to-face with israeli border troops. president assad struggling to refute reports that he is afraid to come out of hiding emerged briefly this week for an elaborately staged government photo-op. even posing with his wife. all this as pressure mounts for the u.s. to get involved militarily to stop the slaughter. >> i think we'll end up providing lethal assistance. and i wouldn't be surprised at some point -- first of all, it's a red line
has resigned. the founder of the rebel-free syrian army, the main group challenging the assad regime seriously injured in a car bombing. a number of developments here as we welcome you to whole new week here on "america's newsroom.". i'm bill hemmer. martha has time for the family. >> i'm heather childers, nice to be here again. secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east. he is urging iraq to stop letting iran use its airspace to shuttle weapons and soldiers to the syrian government >> for those of us engaged in the effort to see president assad step down and a see a democratic process take hold with a transitional government government according to the geneva communique, for those of us engaged in that effort, anything that supports president assad is problematic. bill: so iran claims the flights contain humanitarian supplies. conor powell in the middle east bureau in jerusalem. first of all who is behind the car bomb, the car bomb hit on the rebel commander? >> reporter: so often is the case, bill, really tough to get accurate information coming out of syria. but it is not
by the bashar al-assad regime. president obama expressing frustration with those who question the president about why the united states is not doing more to intervene in the syrian conflict. >> it is fair to say that the united states often finds itself in a situation where does criticize militarily. if we don't go in militarily, then people ask why we are not doing something. lou: senator carl levin, pushing president obama to take a hands-on approach to the removal of bashar al-assad. and as senator john mccain looking for a no-fly zone to be instituted. while calling for surgical airstrikes to help drive the bashar al-assad. the president repeated that any evidence of this weapon to use would be a game changer, as he put it. president obama defended his administration's reluctance to use military force to quell the syrian civil war. >> when we are working with the syrians themselves, so this is not externally imposed, but rather something that is linked directly with the aspirations of the people inside of syria, it will work better. lou: the king has also said the same. inside jordan co
the flow of arms and fighters to the assad regime in syria. kerry pressed leaders in baghdad to crack down on flights from iran to syria which passes over iraqis airspace. >> we had a very spirited discussion on the subject of the overflights. anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad and his regime. >> those opposed to bashar al assad's government are struggling to maintain a united coalition after the head of the u.s.-backed opposition resigned. "the new york times" reports arab nations and turkey have sharply stepped up aid to the rebels with the help of the cia. for more on that, nbc's eamon mohyeldin joins us. >> as you just mentioned there, the greatest concern for u.s. officials right now are the flights coming in from iran over iraq and into syria. now, according to u.s. intelligence estimates as well as syrian opposition figures they believe these flights are carrying important weapons and more importantly cash for the regime of president basha
maliki, accusing him of colluding with iran to prop up the assad regime by permitting almost daily weapons shipments from iran to syria through iraq's airspace. >> we had a very spirited discussion on the subject of the overflights. i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to sustain president assad. and his regime. >> reporter: iraq denies it but u.s. officials say there are far too many flights. plus intelligence that iranian weapons and fighters are also moving overland through iraq to syria. it is called survival in a tough neighborhood. >> for maliki a rebel victory in syria he fears will empower his political opponents in iraq. >> reporter: nbc's richard engel who covered the war from beginning to end. >> iraq didn't become a stable u.s. friendly democracy. but a shiite led state with close ties to iran. still at war with itself. >> reporter: kerry warns prime minister that courting iran risks his partnership with the u.s. >> i also made it clear to him that there are members of congress and people in america who increasing
weapons. there were reports from syria that the president assad regime used chemical weapons against the rebels and the united states reached the conclusion that that is probably not so. this situation is close to the brink of forcing the united states to intervene in some way to prevent crossing this redline. president obama's trip to the region, including jordan, is hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees and highlighted the fact that the situation on the ground in syria is not getting better. there is no sign that it will get better. it does not seem the united states has a response to this ongoing challenge. guest: the united states has been the biggest donor in terms of humanitarian and financial aid to the syrian opposition. close to $500 million so far. also giving logistical and to indications training. we are told there is some training and intelligence being given to the militants, parts of the opposition. we need to understand what is going on in syria is looking like a civil war. a civil war between extremist islamic militant groups that are not real militias. there are
, a she'ite muslim is helping to support the assad regime in syria. now, secretary kerry met with iraqi president nouri al-maliki during a visit in baghdad today. those iranian flights were at the top of the agenda. they had what kerry described as a spirited discussion. here is the secretary. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic and you i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to sustain president assad and his regime. >> reporter: the u.s. believes the iranian aircraft flying over iraq are carrying weapons to arm the syrian government but tehran says they are delivering only humanitarian aid there. they wanted to force the planes for inspections but only a few have been checked. >> i think the intent here by going public is to increase the pressure on al-maliki but the whole incident how minimal influence is on the regime in iraq and how minimal our ability to affect the conflict in syria has become. >> reporter: u.s. officials say the flights are taking place just about every day. kerry says the u.s. congress is
bashar assad eventually leaves there is a risk extremists will take over. >> they thrive in failed states. they thrive in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to actually building things but they are very good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functioning. >> shepard: and no matter how this unfolds, the president says the outcome in syria is not going to be ideal our chief white house correspondent traveling with live in amman jordan. the president is getting more pressure to use military in syria. >> he he is the president wept out and vowed that he would rid asyria of all the extremist still left there a sign that he is ready to kill more people. is he digging in even deeper president obama is getting pressure no-fly zone. come up with surgical air strikes. something to stop the killing. but the president today said at a news conference you have to be very careful with u.s. power. >> what your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily. and, you know, i think it's fair to say that the united states often finds its
supporting a vast expansion in the flow of weapons to syrian rebels fighting president bashar al-assad. the new york times reports the airlift of arms and equipment to the rebels, largely overseen by turkey, has massively increased since early 2012 to include more than 160 flights in jordanian, saudi and qatari planes. u.s. intelligence officers have helped shop for weapons and have vetted rebel groups to decide who gets the arms. the cia's covert backing comes despite the obama administration's public support for solely non-lethal aid to the rebels. meanwhile, the cia has further increased its role in syria by feeding intelligence to rebel fighters for use against the syrian government. the wall street journal reports the move comes as part of the u.s. effort to tamp down on islamist militants in syria by aiding secular forces. secretary of state john kerry has urged iraq to take action to stop iranian flights carrying arms to the al-assad regime to iraqi airspace. john kerry made the comments during a surprise visit to baghdad where he met with iraqi prime minister of maliki. >> i ma
with the civil war in syria. how? the secretary says that iraq has been helping prop up assad as he fights for power there. kerry making an unannounced visitor to iraq and meeting with nuri al-maliki. and stopping the flow of weapons into neighboring syria. weapons that are only making the civil war more deadly. and steve centanni is here. how are they flowing into syria? >> reporter: according to u.s. officials there are flights just about every day, from iran to syria travelling across the iraqi air space. iran says they carry humanitarian aid, but u.s. says they carry weapons to the syrian government. and secretary of state john kerry urged al-maliki to crack down on the flights requiring they land in iraq for inspection before continuing on to syria. >> we had a very spirited discussion on the subject of the overflights and i made it very clear, anything that supports president assad is problematic. >> kerry suggested the future of u.s.-iraqi relations is hanging in the balance here, harris. >> harris: given the recent talks and the possibility of chemical weapons used on citizens and
simply aren't going to improve the situation. the colonel assad is reportedly in stable condition in turkey after an assassination attempt. he was one of the original founders of the free syrian army but has been somewhat marge alized in recent months. colonel assad has never been able to unite the many different groups fighting the syrian regime of the the attack on his life happened while he was touring a rebel area. there is the possibility that there is internal rebel politics at play though syrian rebels blame syria and the assad government for the attack. in another blow to the opposition, the leading opposition figure, katabi offered his resignation yesterday but it was rejected by rebel leaders. on facebook he said he was resigning due to restrictions on his work. the overall inner workings of the syrian opposition is really, really complicated. as actual fighters fighting in syria simply don't report to the syrian leadership and jenna, this really does remain a fragmented syrian opposition and two years into the civil war, it hasn't really improve many in the internationa
in just the. >> what is going to happen? >> ultimately bashar assad will fall. the timing the precise scenario are not known. but the rebels are encroaching. they control more ter another-- territory. they have half of aleppo. they are fighting in the outskirts of damascus am we can see the regime becomes more desperate with its back to the world, may or may not have used chemical weapons. but the calculus is the calculus of desperate -- >> may or may not have used chemical weapons. certainly not in an extent that might be powerful and that might change as the president said, be a game changer. they haven't used him that way. >> right. >> do you believe they would use them that way? that is not-- it's not they. the people bashar assad and those that are supporting him believe that that is the only thing they have left. >> they have made so many mistakes in the past two years that i can't really doubt. it would be a terrible act and a terrible mistake but i can't rule it out. >> rose: i think that they're testing obama. they are testing this red line that obama has put down. they have
to syria, which they're doing on virtually a daily basis now in support of basharof al-assad, which was an inadvertent consequence.an but it stems from the fact that no forces were there to govern iraqi airspace.go second, if we had had even just 1,000 special forces there,st special operations forces to work with the iraqis special operations forces we would have been much more effective against al qaeda in iraq, which is largely defeated during the surge, but not epityler. al qaeda in iraq is now morphed into the anasra front, the primary jihadi organization in syria that is causing us so much heartburn. >> rose: okay, we want to talkch about that when we continue with this segment and some other people who have written about and were reporters there, including john burns, and fouad ajami, dexter filkins, to talk about the implications also in this book-- and michael will stay with us-- having to do witl how do you measure the iraqi war after 10 years, 4,500 american lives, some 30,000 came home injured, $2 trillion, i think, is the number they put on it, correct? >> you can calcu
as spirits, no breakthrough was achieved. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to sustain president assad. >> talks also focused on iraq's transition to democracy as it prepares for upcoming elections at a time when violence is on the rise. >>> back here in the u.s., we're watching a lot of weather. bill karins here with a look at the northeast. you say you're promising this will be the last time. >> it has to be, right? >> i hope you're right. >> ten inches of snow in denver, nine in condition can city. st. louis had 12 inches. this isn't your average snowstorm. st. louis is not a very snowy city. they got a foot of snow. it was the most snow they've had in one single storm going back since 1982. and here it was, the end of march. st. louis should typically be about 60 degrees. i think you get the gist. the storm is moving through the ohio valley, now hitting maryland, d.c. and maryland. we've picked up as much as three to four inches in some areas of maryland. that's pushing
. >>> we have breaking news tonight. ten years after we found chemical weapons in iraq, ba bassar al assad could possibly using the chemical weapons that we know he has right now. >> you're going to hear from one very brave and lucky young man tonight. >> plus congresswoman michelle bamman, she claims that president obama is wasting her money on his lavish lifestyle. where is she getting her facts? we tracked her down and asked her to see how she responded. basically, she wouldn't stop walking or running, almost. keeping them honest. we begin now with breaking news. news that just triggered military action by the united states in syria. the news tonight that the possibility that the regime in syria might be doing the one thing that could trigger american military action. might be using chemical weapons. crossing a redline that president obama himself lay down. now, they have used chemical weapons, that would leave the president with a major challenge as he heads tonight to israel. now, the suggestion that chemical weapons might have been used came a few hours ago today from mike rogers, sa
's thinking on what to do about syria, how the united states can help move to the post-assad period. >> let me ask you quickly about this speech, because it's coming up in about 40 minutes. obviously, the relationship, if you look at the polls between the president and the israeli people, has been strained as well. here's what a university professor wrote in "the daily beast" this morning. mr. obama will be talking to young people who are neither listless cynics nor disaffected sofa-plit koes. many of them have marched in demonstrations and took active part in protest rallies. our record of effective activism is by comparison to every other recent social movement, stellar. is this an important speech for him there? if so, what should his message be? >> well, it is an important speech. he has about a 10% approval rating in israel. that will undoubtedly tick up. but this is part of the president's style. you remember in 2009 he spoke at cairo university. he's made a choice here. he's not going to speak government to government. he's going to move beyond that dialogue to talk directly to the isra
bear. this video we just showed from the assad regime, shown on syrian state television. want to show it again. it's supposedly a victim suffering from a chemical weapons attack. no one shows any physical signs of injury, no con vumgss, no vomiting. three experts say that judging from what they see here, this doesn't seem like a chemical weapons attack. knowing what you know about these type of agents and their effect on humans, do you agree? >> you know, it's difficult to tell without examining the patients. and you need sophisticated equipment to do that. a lot of the symptoms you're seeing in these patients could be caused by insecticide, for instance. any organo phosphate which saron is, but the fact that so few people have died or if any have died tells me that this probably wasn't a sar ron attack but we can't rule out some sort of diluted vehicle. >> the regime is saying it's the rebels using chemicals. if it was something like a diluted chemical, dispersal agent or something, would that be crossing the red line? >> are sure. look, it may be. what we know about syria's chemical
administration to use patriot missiles to degrade the assad regime's air power and the chair and ranking members of the house intelligence committee have introduced a bill calling for the administration to arm syrian rebels. asked today about whether the united states would provide a more aggressive military response to the syrian crisis, the president would only say this. >> the united states often finds itself in a situation where if it goes in militarily then it's criticized for going in militarily. and if it doesn't go in militarily then people say why aren't you doing something militarily, and, you know, my response at this stage is to make sure that what we do contributes to bringing an end to the bloodshed as quickly as possible. >> joining me now is nbc's peteral exandriny. >> the president wraps up his four-day visit to the middle east tomorrow. with renewed pressure to handle the crisis in syria, a nation he's not visiting, what is the effect of this trip been on that issue, do you think? >> reporter: well, i think we've got a pretty good sense of it as i was there in the news conferen
weapon attack in syria. the rebels are blaming president assad's forces, but the government blames the rebels. meanwhile, president obama has said use of chemical weapons would be a red line for his administration. but if these latest accusations prove true, is now the time for u.s. boots on the ground? here now to tell us is house intelligence committee chair mike rogers. he's a republican from michigan. keith and jimmy are still with us. chairman rogers, thank you very much, sir. is there truly conclusive evidence that one side or the other has really used chemical weapons. >> larry, when i look at all of the evidence, all of the intelligence, and the body of reporting over the last two years, i come to the conclusion with a high probability that the assad regime has used, at least in limited quantities, chemical weapons. they've also put them in a position to be used, and i believe, and the intelligence community, i think, believes that they have serious intent to use them under the right circumstances. so the red line that the president talked about, august 20th, was, if they m
. >>> and now syria. the assad regime and rebel forces are accusing one another of using chemical weapons. syrian state media reported that rebel forces launched a chemical attack killing at least two dozen people, injuring more than 100 people. rebels deny that charge vehemently and accuse regime forces of shelling a town near damascus with chemical rockets. our senior international reporter is in amman, jordan, this morning. i know there are a lot of questions to substantiating the claims. what do we know so far? >> reporter: most of the information is coming from syrian state tv. and that's claiming that at least 25 people were killed in some kind of an attack in a village. scores of people wounded. and then syrian state tv playing interviews with some of the alleged victims who were saying that they smelled chlorine and almost all aping the same message, is this the freedom that the free syrian army rebels want? so some of those statements do come out to be a little suspect. neither side has been entirely truthful when it comes to the information and media war over syria. now very qui
don't know enough facts about what happened. the assad regime claimed the opposition used chemical weapons. the opposition claimed the assad regime used them. our ambassador in syria, by the way is in washington, there was no chemical weapons attack at all. here is the bottom line for the united states. these weapons can not be allowed to exit syria. they can in the be allowed to get out of the country to fallnto the happened of al qaeda or other terrorist groups to be used against the united states. melissa: what are the odds of that happening? >> i think they're high. i think the assad regime is in disarray. we can not have confidence. they continue it have command-and-control over those chemical weapons. it h been a goal of al qaeda for decades to get weapons of mass destruction and this may be a real opportunity for them. it's a very dangerous situation. melissa: so what does it mean for stability in the region if we are, sort of at odds as you describe it with israel on some different issues if they perceive us not chiefing close to our traditional partner and ally in the area
concerned that assad president -- president assad cornered desperate, may turn to these sort of chemical weapons. now, if and as you heard there, it is a big if, if any chemical weapon was used today, unlikely that was sara ran or mustard gas. schedule one chemicals according to the chemical weapons geneva convention. more likely according to some witnesses it was chlorine there was according to at least one witness a smell of chlorine in the air. that is only a schedule 3 chemical weapon. that could provide wiggle room for any western governments talking about red lines here, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt in our newsroom in new york. well, a moment for the history books on an a spectacular day in rome. and he sure looked like the people's pope. the new pontiff, pope francis got an upclose and personal with followers young and old as thousands turned up for the inauguration of pope francis. plus, winter is coming to a nasty end. another one-two punch of snow and rain hammering the east. what to expect now ahead from the journalists of fox news on this tuesday fox report. congratulation
anything else in syria. >> in syria, you think it's time? >> the day after assad leaves, the biggest fear is where do the chemical weapons go? remember what happened in libya? all of these weapons are in the middle east. when assad falls we need an international coalition and we'll be part of it to secure the ten or 12 weapons sites that have the weapons. if we don't control those chemical weapons we'll be in real trouble down the road. >> the countries, many have war fatigue. >> yes. >> when you raise the thoughts of boots on the ground in syria, most people chills go up their spine. >> i totally get it. here is what i hope we're not tired of, defending ourselves against weapons of mass destruction. and the question for the american people at large, who gets the weapons when assad falls, radical islamists or control them so we make sure they're not in the bad guy's in general. i'm sorry the war is going on so long and the i want the people at large to say we're war weary, but trust me if we let the weapons get into the iran or islamist hands. it has to be a footprints-- >> and what about
are being used in syria by the assad regime or by rebel groups? what do you think? >> i don't know but chairman rogers, highly respected chairman of the intelligence committee has access to information that very select leaders have in this country. so when he is drawing a conclusion it is likely it is probable, i think we have to take him at his word. i believe also before our government would take any action, they would have to actually confirm that chemical weapons were used. heather: you know syrian president assad, he released some pictures, he released some video. i have, i believe we have some of that, that he says proves that rebel forces used chemical weapons on this attack. he alleges it happened on march 19th in aleppo. just from you viewing this video, taking a look at these pictures, can you yourself tell, i mean, you can't tell if chemical weapons were in fact used here but president assad says this is proof. >> well certainly doctors after a period of time would be able to determine that to be sure. whether we could get accurate information from assad's medical system
to the syrian army through iraqi air space. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic. and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad. there are members of congress and people in america who increasingly are watching what iraq is doing, and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partner for whom americans feel they have tried so hard to be helpful, how that country can be, in fact, doing something that makes it more difficult to achieve our common goals. >> nbc's mike taibbi is live for us in akabul, afghanistan. mike, let's talk. this is not a photo op. this is some tough talk from john kerry. how is it being received? >> well, it has been tough talk from secretary of state john kerry, and you wonder how spirited the discussions are going to be with afghan president hamid karzai. they're meeting and now there will be a joint press conference later. the two men know each other. kerry has made five previous trips here when he was a senator. but there have been strained rel
the ancient city of petra. ramp up criticism of syrian president bashar assad. >> ed henry is live this morning in amman jordan with the very latest. good morning, ed. >> good toe sue i goose, interesting. because as you know you have got syria on jordan's northern border. and there are hundreds of thousands of refugees spilled out because of that ongoing civil war. all that strife. the violence, president assad killing his own people. they are winding up here in jordan. many of them and there is a lot of pressure building. damaging his economy big time pressure on president obama at home all around the world to intervene in some way. carl levin saying saying there should be some kind of surgical air strike. maybe the president should help set up a no-fly zone around syria to pressure assad. the bottom line is the president at a news conference here yesterday said he feels like it's a situation where is he damned if he does, damned if he doesn't. take a listen. >> your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and, you know, i think it's fair to say th
join the effort of others to arm the opposition? how long will assad stay in power? that changes on almost a day-to-day basis because the situation is so uncertain as it enters the third year. the president is a bit defensive because people ask where was the world's biggest super power? you are supposed to be the voice of humanitarian needs around the world. how could you let this go on so long? why haven't you done more? the president said today at the news conference the united states from the start was calling on assad to step down and we know if you look at the calendar it is simply not true. many other countries were ahead of the united states in calling for assad to step down but it's a tough one for the president. he is right in the sense the united states used military force in this region from the beginning, there is still a big hangover from the iraq war in this part of the world. it would have been controversial. all the choices are difficult. he does get a bit defensive when that question is posed, wolf. >> he certainly does at least that is the impression you get fro
described as spirited, no breakthrough was achieved. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact hipping to sustain president assad. >> talks also focused on iraq's transition to democracy as it prepares for upcoming elections at a time when violence is on the rise. >> all right, here's your first look at your dish of scrambled politics. they're warming to the idea of same-sex marriage but many oppose marriage equality. karl rove signaled there could be a major shift in his party's outlook. >> karl rove, could you imagine a republican candidate saying i'm for gay marriage? >> i could. >> the supreme court begins arguments on it, the legality and one benefit to endorsing the notion with one strategist te telling politico opening up the idea will open up donors around the country. >>> zuckerberg is forming an issues advocacy organization focusing on comprehensive immigration reform. >>> rand paul doesn't want to legalize drugs but doesn't want them to go to jail either. >> the l
's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their people and not be so much interested in the kinds of conflicts that have raged for so long in that region. >> you mentioned your hopes are for the inevitable assad regime there in syria. but today one of the national coalition, the head of that resigned. he was the key u.s. ally among the rebels. how big of a blow i
, to prop up assad in syria and that this is something that americans and the congress, that the administration, cannot understand or tolerate, and as kerry told us afterwards, it was a very spirited conversation, because he got a lot of pushback from maliki. maliki argued that assad is facing extremists in this country. so he basically, even though he's not terrible sympathetic with assad politically, assad staying in power is very important for maliki's domestic politics because he fears a takeover by the rebels would actually lead to rebellion fact. the message from kerry was pretty tough. that congress is losing patience with iraq and that maliki will not have any role in the political decisions to come once assad falls with this pll political transition being worked out with international leaders, if he continues to help iran prop up assad. >> there are reports also that the head of the syrian opposition coalition reports that he resigned this post at some point today. what do we know about that, and what kind of complications could that present for the united stat
weapons have been used. they are not sure who used them, the rebels or the assad regime. the united states government has confirmed any of that but we will hear from the president. he has talked about the use of chemical weapons as a red line when it comes to syria. president will overnight here. tomorrow heads to the west bank, next day to jordan and an overnight stay with king abdullah. reporting from jerusalem, this is chuck todd, nbc news. >>> okay, chuck. thanks. we are waiting for that special report in israel. other news now drones debated on capitol hill today as the senate committee discusses the potential for domestic use. various law enforcement agencies, including alameda county sheriff's office have floated the idea of using drones for community surveillance. the unmanned aircraft are already being used by businesses and agriculture. but critics have raised concerns about privacy. drones took the spotlight a few weeks ago during kentucky senator rand paul's 13-hour filibuster on the senate floor when he discussed the possibility of drone strikes against u.s. citizens. >>> a bi
give some very specific messages. he repeated his warning to the assad regime not to dare use chemical weapons, which are of course a direct threat to israel as well, saying that the united states will respond. and he made a very strong iron-clad commitment on iran, another thing that israelis want to hear. >> you know, interesting you mention the heckler and you talk about the charm offensive. i believe it has been called operation desert schmooze by "the atlantic." he handled that very well. he got some laughs when he said, i wouldn't feel comfortable here if i hadn't been heckled at least once during a speech. but andrea, the genesis of all of this, and really as you talk about this being the crux of this particular trip, peace is necessary, peace is just, peace is possible. do you think those are the sentiments that are truly reflected there in israel? do you think people believe that peace could be possible? is there any kind of a time frame that you ever hear people say, if only this could happen, that could happen? >> israel is prosperous, but israel is now threatened by all of
it a significant esklation of the assad regime. >> the carnage grows. the port is building in the west to give weapons to syrian rebels. cnn's nick peyton walsh is joining us from beirut. let's start with the rockets fired into lebanon. how close to the capitol did they come? >> reporter: it was still pretty far out in the border region between lebanon and syria. very mountainous, indistinct where the border is. we understand two war planes hit derelict buildings, but governments tried to keep out of the fighting with a policy that calls disassociation. the concern is not that this will get a government or military response back to syria, but it might ignite the sectarian tensions inside lebanon, which pretty much mirror those that play in syria. also point out, wolf, rebels unleashing a barrage of rockets in central damascus, too. a real uptick in violence today, wolf. >> when it comes to arming the rebels, looks like there's a change emerging from the united states. what's going on? >> reporter: well, john kerry came out today and said quite clearly that he would not stand in the way of alli
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